Care Quality Commission report published in Jan 2017

View full report : Quality Care Report 7th January 2017

Updated 7 January 2017

We undertook this unannounced focused inspection on 13 December 2016 to check that the provider had addressed the breach in regulation identified at our last unannounced comprehensive inspection on the 27 May 2016. At our last visit we identified that the registered manager had not made any applications under the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards for people whose liberty may have been restricted. At our inspection in May 2016 we saw that some people’s capacity had been assessed, but they were not in place for everyone that needed support in making decisions. The registered manager sent us a report in June 2016 to address the areas of concern we identified.

The area that required improvement at our last visit was under the key question; is the service effective. This report covers the areas that required improvement and all key lines of enquiry (KLOE) under this question. The KLOEs are a set of questions we use that directly relate to the five key questions we ask of all services. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection visit, by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for The Hermitage Charity Care Trust on our website at www.cqc.org.uk

The Hermitage Charity Care Trust provides accommodation and personal care for up to 30 older people, ladies only. They are not registered to provide nursing care. At the time of this inspection visit there were 29 people living at the home.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We saw that improvements had been made to ensure people’s rights were protected, as mental capacity assessments were in place for people that needed support to make decisions. Applications were being made under the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards for people whose liberty may be restricted.

Staff gained people’s verbal consent before supporting them with any care tasks and helped people to make their own decisions. Staff knew about people’s care and support needs and received training to support their knowledge and learning. People received food and drink that met their nutritional needs and preferences and were referred to healthcare professionals to maintain their health and wellbeing.

 

View full report : Quality Care Report 7th January 2017

Care Quality Commission report published in June 2016

Report Summary:


This inspection visit took place on the 27 May 2016 and was unannounced.

The Hermitage Charity Care Trust provides accommodation and personal care support for up to 30 older
women. There were 30 people who used the service at the time of our visit.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care
Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our previous visit on the 14 November 2014 the service was meeting the regulations that we checked but we did ask the provider to make some improvements. Although best interest decisions were in place for people that were unable to make specific decisions for themselves, mental capacity assessments had not been completed to demonstrate that these people lacked the capacity to make decisions. At this visit we saw that some improvements had been made, some people had received a capacity assessment, but they were not in place for everyone that needed support in making decisions. The registered manager had not made any applications under the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards for people whose liberty may have been restricted.

People told us and we saw there were sufficient staff available to support them. Staff had knowledge about people’s care and support needs to enable care to be provided in a safe way. Staff told us that they were supported by the management team and provided with the relevant training to ensure people’s needs could be met.

Staff understood what constituted abuse or poor practice and systems and processes were in place to
protect people from the risk of harm. Policies were in place and followed so that medicines were managed safely and people were given their medicine as and when needed. Thorough recruitment checks were done prior to employment to ensure the staff were suitable to support people.

Assessments were in place that identified risks to people’s health and safety and care plans directed staff on how to minimise identified risks. Plans were in place to respond to emergencies to ensure people were supported in accordance with their needs. Care staff told us they had all the equipment they needed to assist people safely and understood about people’s individual risks. The provider checked that the
equipment was regularly serviced to ensure it was safe to use.

Staff gained people’s verbal consent before supporting them with any care tasks and helped people to make their own decisions. People received food and drink that met their nutritional needs and preferences, and were referred to healthcare professionals to maintain their health and wellbeing.

People were supported to socialise and take part in activities to promote their wellbeing. People told us that they liked the staff and we saw that people’s dignity and privacy was respected by the staff team. Visitors told us the staff made them feel welcome and were approachable and friendly.

Staff listened to people’s views and people knew how to make a complaint or raise concerns. There were
processes in place for people and their relatives to express their views and opinions about the service
provided. People felt the service was well managed and they were asked to express their views and be
involved in decisions related to the planning of their care. There were systems in place to monitor the quality of the service to enable the manager and provider to drive improvement.


To view the full report, please visit this link.

 

Care Quality Commission report published in April 2015

Report Summary:


This inspection was unannounced and took place on the 14 November 2014.

The Hermitage Charity Care Trust provides accommodation and personal care support for up to 30 older women. There were 29 people who used the service at the time of our visit.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection on 9 May 2014 we asked the provider to take action to make improvements. This was because capacity assessments were not in place for people that lacked capacity to make decisions for themselves, and not all identified areas of need had a risk assessment and care plan in place to ensure people’s safety and welfare was maintained. The provider sent us an action plan after the inspection to confirm that these improvements would be in place by 31 July 2014.

At this inspection all areas of people’s identified need were included in the care records seen, this meant that
staff had the information needed to support people effectively.

The manager had undertaken best interest meetings for people that lacked capacity but mental capacity assessments had not been completed for these people.

This meant that the provider had not always acted in accordance with legal requirements. The registered manager had not made an application under the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards for people who used the service, even though their liberty may have been restricted.

Sufficient staffing levels were provided to meet the needs of people. Staffing levels were monitored and actions had been taken to recruit additional staff to meet people’s needs.

People received their medication as prescribed but staff were not recording the actual dose administered for
variable dose medicines, such as ‘as required’ medicines for pain relief. Therefore if a person asked for more pain
relief staff would not be able to determine from the records, whether they had already had the maximum dose or not. This meant that people’s ‘as required’ pain relief was not managed appropriately.

Staff had a good understanding of the safeguarding adults procedure and demonstrated that they knew how to report any concerns disclosed to them. People who used the service told us they felt safe at the home.

The care and support provided to people met their identified needs and preferences and staff demonstrated a good understanding of people’s individual needs.

Care plans were reviewed regularly to ensure people’s needs continued to be met.

People liked the staff and told us that their needs and preferences were met and confirmed that their opinions
and views were sought and listened to.

Staff told us that they were supported by the management team and provided with the relevant training to ensure people’s needs could be met. Audits were undertaken and regularly monitored and assessed to drive improvement; however no written audits were undertaken regarding the management of medicines.

You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.


To view the full report, please visit this link.

The Hermitage celebrates it’s 80th Birthday

The Hermitage celebrated its 80th Birthday on the 5th November 2014. On the Saturday an “open home” was enjoyed by everyone present.

Welcome to the New Hermitage Website

We are proud to unveil the new and improved Hermitage website, we feel it better reflects the quality of our home and the high standard of care we offer. Our thanks goes out to InnerVision Software for designing the website.