Care Quality Commission report published in Jan 2017

View full report : Quality Care Report 7th January 2017

Updated 7 January 2017

We undertook this unannounced focused inspection on 13 December 2016 to check that the provider had addressed the breach in regulation identified at our last unannounced comprehensive inspection on the 27 May 2016. At our last visit we identified that the registered manager had not made any applications under the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards for people whose liberty may have been restricted. At our inspection in May 2016 we saw that some people’s capacity had been assessed, but they were not in place for everyone that needed support in making decisions. The registered manager sent us a report in June 2016 to address the areas of concern we identified.

The area that required improvement at our last visit was under the key question; is the service effective. This report covers the areas that required improvement and all key lines of enquiry (KLOE) under this question. The KLOEs are a set of questions we use that directly relate to the five key questions we ask of all services. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection visit, by selecting the ‘all reports’ link for The Hermitage Charity Care Trust on our website at www.cqc.org.uk

The Hermitage Charity Care Trust provides accommodation and personal care for up to 30 older people, ladies only. They are not registered to provide nursing care. At the time of this inspection visit there were 29 people living at the home.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We saw that improvements had been made to ensure people’s rights were protected, as mental capacity assessments were in place for people that needed support to make decisions. Applications were being made under the Mental Capacity Act Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards for people whose liberty may be restricted.

Staff gained people’s verbal consent before supporting them with any care tasks and helped people to make their own decisions. Staff knew about people’s care and support needs and received training to support their knowledge and learning. People received food and drink that met their nutritional needs and preferences and were referred to healthcare professionals to maintain their health and wellbeing.

 

View full report : Quality Care Report 7th January 2017